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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 90 (some duplicates have been removed)
because the turks have been very upset with the u.s. policy toward iran. they see it as too confrontational. the problem is that the americans are not in an advice- taking mode. actually we're not very good at taking advice in general. we're actually used to giving advice. the idea that we should have partners in the middle east who have other ideas about how to approach the crises there. we should maybe adjust our policies according to what our friends in the neighborhood suggest. it's something we're just not ready for. and so senator kerry on the broadcast here recently said to me, you know, turkey speaks to and has resonance with the arab street today, number one. number two, they're in a contest for leadership in the arab world. >> you're absolutely right. i wouldn't say just the arab world but the whole middle east. turkey is now able to play a role that no other country can play. how did turkey get to this position? because it's only been ten years that turkey has been really active in the world. before that turkey was just the loyal faithful foot soldier of the u.s.
, a man who knows afghanistan and pakistan well and who the u.s. military is increasingly listening to. >> i think one of general mcchrystal's legacies is that the elders really felt that we were there to listen and help them. although he was called the architect of the kandahar operation, which means hope in pashto, which was supposed to materialize, he, by the means of the elders, was advised not to do this operation. >> charlie: pakistan's ambassador to the united states, and greg mortenson. next. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following. ♪ >> additional funding provided by these funders. >> and by bloomberg. a provider of multimedia captioning sponsored by rose cmunications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> charlie: in the first public reaction, today, to the leaking of the documents about afghanistan and pakistan, president obama said that he was concerned about the leaks but there was no new information coming from them. >> while i'm concerned about the disclosure of sensitive information from the battlefield that could potentially jeopar
would actually be there. but what happens is that because for example, u.s.a.i.d.-- again an organization that has a lot of good will in it-- it also moves with the political agendas of the united states government and so project... projects or assignments or those that are applied for by n.g.o.s become limited to those things which go straight along with the u.s. agenda. so these are the kind of things that have to be thought out very very clearly. one of the kind of no-brainers in things where i would encourage people to put money is in rubble clearing. >> this is jean baptist and this was one of the main streets. this is the area we're working on clearing now. >> this corner, people stay here like late at night. they're having fun here, there was a t.v. here, there was water here, but most of the people used to hang out here. >> so this was like the town square. >> exactly. >> rose: time after time when ski people about haiti, that's what they say, you need to get rid of the rubble. >> you'll do no harm by clearing the streets to let the haitian people make their own co
a ahead. the private sector added just 83,000 jobs last month. overall the u.s. lost 125,000 jobs in june as temporary government census workers departed. the unemployment rate declined to 9.5% in june from 9.7% the previous month. but the number of people outside the labor force who are neither working nor look for work rose to 800,000. unemployment claims also rose by 13,000 to 472,000. earlier today president obama spoke about the challenges ahead. >> all told by economy has created nearly 600,000 private sector jobs this year. it is a stark turn around from the first six months of last year when we lost 3.7 million jobs in the height of the recession. make no mistake, we are headed in the right direction but as i was reminded on a troip racine, wisconsin, earlier this week, we're not headed there fast enough for a lot of americans. we're not headed there fast enough for me either. we continue to fight headwinds of global markets. we still have a great deal of work to do to repair the economy and get the american people back to work. >> rose: joining me now is paul krugman, a nobel pri
prosecutors accused 11 people of nuclear weapons, u.s. policies towards iran, politics and other topics. the case is a reminder while they may be friendly country there are no friendly intelligence agencies. the suspected agent operating under deep cover some of them appeared in new york, boston and virginia. they include four couples, among them is a real estate agent, business cuttant, planner and reporter. the 11 suspect disappeared in the island of sk cyprus where he was arrested and released. the arrests came just days after russian president medvedev met with president obama on an ongoing effort to reset russia-u.s. relations. the russian foreign ministry has set the effect will not negatively effect bilateral relations. president obama sought to lay down the impact of the case. joining me from washington, scott shane from "the new york times." he's been reporting on the story. charles cup chance on the council of foreign relations at georgetown university and peter earnest a former c.i.a. officer director of the international spy museum in washington. i am pleased to have all of
in the pakistani embassy in washington where iran has an intersection. today a u.s. official told the "new york times" that amiri was "one of the sources providing information about iran's nuclear program as united states argued for a fourth round of sanctions. speaking about the matter for the first time, secretary of state hillary clinton said today that amiri was in the united states of his own free will. many questions remain about the case and its implications. joining me from washington, david sanger of the "new york times," he's been following the story for the paper for a year and a half. i'm pleased to have him back on this program. so, david (laughs) what's going on and what are the americans saying and what are the pakistanis saying and what are the iranians saying? >> charlie, in the bizarre collection of spy stories, particularly after last week's strange story of the russian sleepers this is sort of the modern update. mr. amiri was a junior-level scientist working at a university which is directly across the street from the offices in tehran that are believed to house the sort of
that the u.s. does have some humanitarian interest in afghanistan. it isn't simply national security, but it is a nation-building aspect. >> rose: so tell me about her. >> i was very, very, very keen about making sure that she understood the consequences of being on the cover of "time" magazine, that she was protected that she was ensalated from anything that might happen. but, at the same time, this is a young woman who was brutallized in a way that is unimaginable. and yet sheaf very aware of the picture being taken. she was certainly aware that it was going to be on the cover. she wanted to show the world what had happened to her, she wanted to become in fact what i think she will become, a symbol for the brutality ofhital began regime. >> rose: afghanistan, we have had now petraeus there for a while. tell me what you think is going on and what keend of assessment they are making about the reality of how afghanistan is different than iraq. >> from what i've heard, general petraeus is having the same sort of tough time trying to convince hamid karzai to build a noncorrupt governmen
in scotland with a lot-to-prove and a growing chorus of doubters. he underachieved at the master's and the u.s. open this spring. he failed to break par at any round of the at&t national two weeks ago. joining me from los angeles is jim gray, a long-time sportscaster and contributing to the golf channel. i am pleased to have him on this program. size up this british open. i love the fact that justin rose is on a roll. i love the fact that westwood has won. >> well i think you hit it right there. justin rose is the hot golfer, he's one twice, almost three times. he had an opportunity to win a third tournament and, of course, he won very big the at&t a couple weeks ago and he has been playing some great golf. of course we remember when he broke on the scene at the british open back in 1998, he was just a young man at 17 at royalbergdale and he struggled up until this year and now he has it going. lee westwood is one of the best golfers in the world. unfortunately he has a calf problem. he said today he probably wouldn't be playing in this championship if it weren't the open so he's down. but we
as time geithner has, but the u.s. economy is still struggling. unemployment is painfully high. all eyes are now on the administration as it turns to explaining what this bill is all about and how it helps americans. i'm pleased to have secretary geithner with me on this day. welcome. >> nice to see you, charlie. >> charlie: this bill. what does it do? >> i think you have to start by looking at the basic failures that led to the crisis. after the great depression, we put in place the strongest protections over our financial system and they helped lay the foundation for decades of investment innovation growth on a scale you hadn't seen any other major economy deliver over time, but we let the moss accumulate, the rust develop and we let an entire parallel industry of people in the business of finance -- mortgage brokers, pay-day lenders, large investment banks and large insurance companies -- operate outside of those basic constraints without the basic protections the system needs to function well to make sure it's providing finance for companies, helping consumers save for retirement, pu
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 90 (some duplicates have been removed)